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Polar Bear Photography

Re: Polar Bear Photo Safari ~ Thanks for coming Birgit!

Polar bear and fox at Seal River Lodge

Facing the arctic world... together. Birgit-Cathrin Duval Photo

We were delighted once again this fall to have photojournalist Birgit-Cathrin Duval from Germany spend some time with us at one of our lodges.

Birgit’s visit to Seal River Lodge for the Polar Bear Photo Safari marked her third expedition with Churchill Wild in the past 10 seasons and she has written some great stories about all three of our destinations.

Her stunning photographs bear testimony to her enthusiastic exclamation that this was her best trip with us to date. Next she wants to swim with the belugas and encounter our summer polar bears on the Birds, Bears and Belugas Adventure, after which we’ll have to build another lodge I suppose, to provide more fodder for her snappy lens and nimble pen!

A few of Birgit’s wonderful photos appear below. For more stories and polar bear photos please visit her Web site at www.takkiwrites.com.

Thanks Birgit!


New Photo Contest for Seal River Heritage Lodge Guests

Seal River Heritage Lodge

Seal River Heritage Lodge

The Province of Manitoba nominated the Seal River to the Canadian Heritage Rivers System (CHRS) in June 1987. The nominated section is 260 km long and extends from the junction of the North and South Seal rivers, at Shethanei Lake, to Hudson Bay. This is the area we hike to and swim with beluga whales during our Birds Bears & Belugas Adventure every summer.

Named for the harbour seals that are found up to 200 km upstream from Hudson Bay, Manitoba’s Seal River rushes through open spruce forest, tundra and boiling rapids. Too rugged for even the early fur traders, the river’s remote vastness remains home to spectacular wildlife such as caribou, wolverine, polar bear and 3,000 beluga whales that summer in its estuary on Hudson Bay. The Seal River’s designation to the CHRS was primarily based on its exceptional natural heritage.

We recently became aware of a contest that many of our guests may be interested in entering and here it is. Please note that this is not a Churchill Wild contest:

Experience Canadian Heritage Rivers Photo Contest

Help capture the splendour and the excitement of the Canadian Heritage Rivers! Parks Canada’s Canadian Heritage Rivers System (CHRS) is pleased to partner with Rapid Media’s Canoeroots and Family Camping Magazine for a second year to launch the Experience Canadian Heritage Rivers photo contest.

Photos can be submitted in the following four categories:

1) Canadian Heritage Rivers and Family;

2) Canadian Heritage Rivers and Nature;

3) Canadian Heritage Rivers and Cities; and

4) Canadian Heritage Rivers and Adventure.

The contest runs from May 15 to October 31, 2012. Winning photos will be published in the Spring 2013 issue of Canoeroots and Family Camping Magazine and will also tour throughout North America in the 2013 edition of the Reel Paddling Film Festival. To learn more about the contest and to submit photos, visit the Canoeroots Web site: http://www.canoerootsmag.com/chrsphotocontest/ .

The contest seeks to increase Canadians’ sense of connection to the Canadian Heritage Rivers System, and to the outstanding natural, cultural and recreational heritage of these special rivers. Through the contest, Canadians can communicate their unique and exciting perceptions and experiences of Canadian Heritage Rivers.

The CHRS is the world’s largest river conservation program, with 42 rivers spanning close to 11,000 kilometres.  The program was established in 1984 by federal, provincial and territorial governments to conserve rivers with outstanding heritage values, to give them national recognition, and to encourage the public to enjoy and appreciate them.

 

 

Churchill Wild 2011 Photo Contest Winners

Congratulations to our 2011 Churchill Wild Photo Contest Winners!

Curious Arctic Fox at Seal River - Joel Davidson Photo

For a smile I will :) Joel Davidson Photo

Every year we solicit entries from our guests for a Churchill Wild Photo Contest. Some of the most stunning images on our website have come from these contests. We break it into categories and hand out big discounts towards future safaris as grand prizes. This year we added an Amateur category, as we get a wide range of experience levels.

The entries were judged by Dennis Fast. There were a very high number of entrants and Dennis had an incredibly tough batch of photos to choose from. Thank you to everyone who submitted photos, we really appreciate it!

Below are the winners followed by a mini photo gallery.

Amateur: 1. Rod Hallet 2.  Marieke Briggen

Landscape: 1. Bob Leaper 2. Steve McDonough

Other Wildlife: 1. Daniel D’Auria 2. Bob Smith

People: 1. Terry Allen 2. Joel Davidson

Polar bears: 1. Louise Atkinson 2. Joel Davidson

Click image to see larger version.

Polar Bear Photo Safari at Nanuk Polar Bear Lodge

Nanuk Polar Bear Lodge from the air.

Getting ready to land at Nanuk Polar Bear Lodge.

Dennis Fast is hosting our first ever Polar Bear Photo Safari at Nanuk Polar Bear Lodge. This one week departure takes place August 26-September 1, 2012 on the coast of Hudson Bay in the Cape Tatnum Wildlife Management area.

Dennis’ work can be seen all over our website and promotional materials. He has been working with Churchill Wild since the beginning and is our resident photo expert (as well as an incredible guide).

Below he answers some questions many photographers have asked in recent weeks.

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Everyone who comes to Nanuk Polar Bear Lodge wants to know what lenses to bring, and that is an important question.

Most pros would bring at least one lens that can reach out to 500mm or even 600mm. We all know, however, that those lenses are both costly and heavy. So a compromise may be in order for both reasons.

On my trip to Nanuk, I used my 500mm least of all. It’s true that the coast is vast, and bears often are spotted at a distance. The temptation is to get as big a lens as possible on the camera and start shooting. In the end, a little patience delivers a curious bear right into easy range for a 100-400mm zoom or something in that range.

Northern Lights over Hudson Bay - Dennis Fast photo

I have taken a lot of photos of bears using just my 70-200mm with a variety of multipliers, including 1.4x. 1.7x, and 2.0x. When mothers and cubs show up at the lodge, and they frequently do, they will be at close range and you will quickly be abandoning your long lenses. Remember also that the multiplier effect of most digital cameras, unless they are “full frame” increases the power of all your lenses by a factor of 1.3x to 1.6x depending on the camera you are using. I have a very compact 28-300mm lens which I plan to use a lot in the North this year. It’s light weight and size makes it easy to hand-hold and keep at the ready at all times. With a C-size sensor it quickly becomes about a 40-450mm lens – great for almost anything.

Nanuk, however, is not just about the bears. The scenery is spectacular along the coast with sandy beaches and shallow inshore lagoons great for birds and reflections – there goes my 28-300mm again!

The sun spot activity is also increasing at a steady rate as we approach the zenith of its 11-13 year cycle. That means the northern lights could be awesome this year all over the arctic. For that you will definitely want a reasonably fast wide-angle lens. I use my 14-24mm lens a lot for the aurora, but my 24mm-70mm seems to be a great lens for that too. Any wide-angle will allow you to get some of the landscape included in the shots of the sweeping aurora to add a sense of scale. Without that you don’t get the feel of how vast the aurora-filled sky really is!

Polar bear cubs with Mom at Nanuk Polar bear Lodge.
Curious polar bear cubs with Mom at Nanuk

In short, bring what you can comfortably carry without jeopardizing your weight restrictions. And don’t over-do it: a few zooms should cover almost everything for you. Unless you are a pro, you can probably leave your biggest lens at home.

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For more information you can call our office at 204-377-5090 or toll free at 1-866-UGO-WILD (846-9453)

You can also email Doreen at info@churchillwild.com

 

Polar bear looking for Cranberry Cake. With Butter Sauce.

Polar bear looking for Cranberry Cake at Seal River Heritage Lodge. JulieThompson Photo

Cranberry Cake with Butter Sauce. Just one piece. Please...

This cool polar bear photo was taken by Julie Thompson at Seal River Heritage Lodge and it was attracting all kinds of attention on the Churchill Wild Facebook Page. It was suggested that the bear smelled the Cranberry Cake with Butter Sauce, a Lodge favorite from our Blueberries and Polar Bears Cookbooks. Hmm… well… it is delicious! The bear obviously knew that :)

Here’s what Julie had to say:

I tell people I walked amongst the polar bears just to see the looks on their faces.  Some can’t believe it’s possible.  They’ve never heard of such a thing.

“How close were you to one of the greatest predators on earth?” is usually a question which follows.

“Pretty close” I say, as they peruse our photo book with awestruck faces.

Standing outside of the lodge, we cautiously watched our resident bear approach.  He was an inquisitive one, determined to enter into our “home away from home.”

I think he enjoyed the attention and our company.  Always peeking into windows and pacing around the compound looking for a quick entry.  He was affectionately known as Snuggleputz.  The previous group staying at the lodge named him.  While there was much discussion surrounding renaming him, Snuggleputz is the only name which sticks in my mind.

This bear gave us fantastic photo opportunities throughout our stay.  With expert wildlife photographer, Dennis Fast, leading our group, we were always learning, whether it be out on a tundra trek or during one of his early evening fireside chats.  We met fantastic people from around the globe who shared in our love of photography, we ate great food and were welcomed into the lodge as if we were part of the family.

Perhaps Snuggleputz sensed this warmth, the fun and friendliness of the lodge and he just wanted a glimpse of it for himself.  If only someone would hear his knock.